Articles

23 Mar Who and How to Tell People About Your Addiction

The decision of if, when, and how you should tell someone else about your addiction is a personal matter - and it’s not one to be taken lightly. Naturally, you wouldn’t dream of just blabbing to the stranger in the coffee shop that you once were a heroin or meth addict, or that you had a compulsive sexual addiction. They’d likely be put off by information of such a personal nature. But you also don’t want to get too far along in a new relationship – however intimate – before you reveal some of your past. The question, then, is how open can you be about your addiction?

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09 Feb How to Show Compassion for an Addicted Loved One – Without Being a Doormat

When there’s an addict in the family, it takes an emotional and sometimes physical toll on everyone. Sure, you want to be understanding. It’s tough enough for the addict to admit he or she has a problem with alcohol or substance abuse, or gambling, compulsive sexual behavior, and eating disorder or overwork. Your loved one may not yet be ready to acknowledge the problem, or isn’t quite able to reach out for help. You’re left to bear the brunt of the addict’s roller coaster of emotional outbursts, as well as the binges, broken promises, missing money, and possible physical violence. While you do want to show compassion, you don’t want to be a doormat. Here are some suggestions.
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20 Nov Tuinal Abuse

Tuinal contains two active ingredients – amobarbital sodium and secobarbital sodium. Both of these drugs belong to a group of medicines known as barbiturates. Such medications are known to cause drowsiness and are often used to induce sleep in those with insomnia issues.
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24 Sep Amytal Abuse

Amytal is a type of barbiturate used in the treatment of severe sleeping disorders. Amobarbital sodium is the active ingredient in sodium Amytal capsules. When used properly, Amytal causes drowsiness in order to induce sleep. The medication works by enhancing the action of a neurotransmitter called GABA in the brain.
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18 Sep Buspar Abuse

The trade name for buspirone, Buspar is an anomaly of the anti-anxiety medications as it is not chemically or pharmacologically related to benzodiazepines, barbiturates or sedative drugs. Instead, it activates Serotonin and acts on Dopamine receptors in the brain. Instead, Buspar is part of the azaspirodecanedione class of compounds and is often promoted as non-sedative, non-addictive and relatively safe.
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09 Sep Adderall Abuse

Adderall is the brand name for a pharmaceutical psychostimulant and is used to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The drug is a product of mixed amphetamine salts and achieves its effectiveness from increasing the amount of norepinephrine and dopamine in the brain.
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09 Aug 15 Ways Drugs Destroy Your Self-Image

In the euphoria of a drug high, it may be next to impossible to see any downfall in your current lifestyle. But when you do come down, as you inevitably will, keep the following list handy and refer to it when the drug cloud lifts sufficiently for you to understand how badly drugs are destroying your self image.
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17 Jun You Caught Your Teen Stealing Your Prescription Drugs – Now What?

Often it happens by accident. You’re cleaning up the trail of debris left by your teenaged son or daughter and baggies or plastic-wrapped packages of pills fall out of coats, jackets, jeans, purses, etc. Maybe you’re dusting their bedroom, putting away fresh laundry, or rearranging photos or other items in the room. What you discover turns your stomach to lead. Those brightly colored pills look vaguely familiar. With trembling hands, you carry the pills to your medicine cabinet and compare them with what’s there. They may be your prescription medications.
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